1. 11:03 21st Apr 2014

    Notes: 288112

    Reblogged from sesametofu

    katelinnea:

    nedian:

    I love when cats decide they love something.

    That is a very patient bunny.

    (Source: faunasworld-moved)

     
  2. 11:00

    Notes: 15425

    Reblogged from volnaib

    eschergirls:

    nadadoll:

    figure 1: head drawings by Andrew Loomis, 1956

    figure 2: women’s head designs can be generated by the same methods, they don’t have to all look very nearly the same

    Some food for thought for drawing women and avoiding drawing a single female face.  Too often artists seem to be afraid to give women big noses or lines or other distinguishing features, and we end up with the same face on all the characters.  I’ve been browsing a lot of genderswap art lately and I’ve noticed that when male characters with large noses, thin faces, wrinkles, or other features get genderswapped, they tend to end up with small noses, round faces, and no wrinkles, and they no longer look distinct (they also look much younger than the original).  So, just some references and a reminder that women’s faces have all sorts of different features, and you don’t need to just have small cute features with no wrinkles to have a character look female.

     
  3. 13:18 20th Apr 2014

    Notes: 2

    Tags: mepersonal

    So yeah I am back from Strasbourg, it was awesome and my couchsurfing host was as well. Stayed there maybe a bit too much, so I had to ride my bicycle in the night the last couple of hours. Well, at least that gave me the chance to see the Mars which is in opposition with Earth right now.

     
  4. 13:10

    Notes: 61

    Reblogged from sudo-chessecake

    best-of-imgur:

This is the clearest picture of Mercury ever taken.http://best-of-imgur.tumblr.com

    best-of-imgur:

    This is the clearest picture of Mercury ever taken.
    http://best-of-imgur.tumblr.com

     
  5. 01:07 19th Apr 2014

    Notes: 6

    Reblogged from krita-foundation

    toast-weasel-illustration:

The Krita folks requested a screenshot of my artwork within the program UI for the Steam store so I happily complied.The ball is really rolling with Krita Gemini and it’s currently in Early Access on Steam. Despite some bugs (which are being ironed out posthaste) I seriously, dearly love this program and highly recommend all artists give it a go. It’s starting to catch on in the greater community and all sorts of tutorials and brush sets are starting to appear for it. It’s only going to keep getting better!

    toast-weasel-illustration:

    The Krita folks requested a screenshot of my artwork within the program UI for the Steam store so I happily complied.The ball is really rolling with Krita Gemini and it’s currently in Early Access on Steam. Despite some bugs (which are being ironed out posthaste) I seriously, dearly love this program and highly recommend all artists give it a go. It’s starting to catch on in the greater community and all sorts of tutorials and brush sets are starting to appear for it. It’s only going to keep getting better!

     
  6. 22:49 17th Apr 2014

    Notes: 438

    Reblogged from newsweek

    newsweek:

Scientists Find Earth-Sized Distant Planet That Could Support Water

Five hundred light years away, the fifth planet orbiting a small dim star called Kepler-186 has caught scientists’ eyes as being not only roughly Earth-sized, but also within what’s called the “habitable zone” that could support liquid water on the planet’s surface. 

The planet, called Kepler-186f, was discovered using NASA’s Kepler spacecraft, which, like the Earth, is orbiting our sun. It stares out at distant stars and looks for planets orbiting them by detecting the way those stars dim when a planet passes between that star and Kepler’s eye. 

Kepler has observed this particular planet multiple times as it has transited in front of its star, and this has allowed scientists to measure its size and its orbital period, which is 130 days. The planet is just 10 percent bigger than the Earth itself is. 

“The significance of this result is that even though Kepler has previously discovered planets the size of the Earth, and it’s previously discovered planets that are in the habitable zone, this is the first time we’ve put the two of those together,” Stephen Kane, a professor of astrophysics at San Francisco University and one of the researchers on this project, tells Newsweek. He’s a co-author of a new paper in the journal Science announcing the results. 

The planet is likely rocky, and not made of gas, says Kane. While it isn’t possible to literally see that there is water on the planet’s surface, the conditions imply that it is “likely to have the properties required to maintain reservoirs of liquid water,” as the Science article concludes. More good news in the search for planets where the conditions are right for having liquid water is the fact that the kind of star this Earth-sized planet is orbiting, an M-dwarf star, is “the most common type of star in the universe—far more common than the sun,” says Kane. “That’s really great news for habitability.” 

The implication is that if there can be an Earth-sized planet orbiting such a common kind of star and within the habitable zone, there might be more of these planets where the conditions are right for water. 

Ravi Kopparapu, a planetary scientist at The Pennsylvania State University, is an expert on the habitable zone and notes that Kepler-186f is similar to, but smaller than, a planet outside of our solar system called Kepler-62f, which is also terrestrial and in the habitable zone. 

But this new find is closer to Earth size’s than that planet. (After a planet gets to be about 1.5 times the size of Earth is, its gravity attracts hydrogen and helium and makes it unlikely to have liquid water on its surface.) “I think it’s pretty pretty cool that they found this planet,” he says. “This shows that potential habitable planets are more common than our estimates.”

    newsweek:

    Scientists Find Earth-Sized Distant Planet That Could Support Water

    Five hundred light years away, the fifth planet orbiting a small dim star called Kepler-186 has caught scientists’ eyes as being not only roughly Earth-sized, but also within what’s called the “habitable zone” that could support liquid water on the planet’s surface.

    The planet, called Kepler-186f, was discovered using NASA’s Kepler spacecraft, which, like the Earth, is orbiting our sun. It stares out at distant stars and looks for planets orbiting them by detecting the way those stars dim when a planet passes between that star and Kepler’s eye.

    Kepler has observed this particular planet multiple times as it has transited in front of its star, and this has allowed scientists to measure its size and its orbital period, which is 130 days. The planet is just 10 percent bigger than the Earth itself is.

    “The significance of this result is that even though Kepler has previously discovered planets the size of the Earth, and it’s previously discovered planets that are in the habitable zone, this is the first time we’ve put the two of those together,” Stephen Kane, a professor of astrophysics at San Francisco University and one of the researchers on this project, tells Newsweek. He’s a co-author of a new paper in the journal Science announcing the results.

    The planet is likely rocky, and not made of gas, says Kane. While it isn’t possible to literally see that there is water on the planet’s surface, the conditions imply that it is “likely to have the properties required to maintain reservoirs of liquid water,” as the Science article concludes. More good news in the search for planets where the conditions are right for having liquid water is the fact that the kind of star this Earth-sized planet is orbiting, an M-dwarf star, is “the most common type of star in the universe—far more common than the sun,” says Kane. “That’s really great news for habitability.”

    The implication is that if there can be an Earth-sized planet orbiting such a common kind of star and within the habitable zone, there might be more of these planets where the conditions are right for water.

    Ravi Kopparapu, a planetary scientist at The Pennsylvania State University, is an expert on the habitable zone and notes that Kepler-186f is similar to, but smaller than, a planet outside of our solar system called Kepler-62f, which is also terrestrial and in the habitable zone.

    But this new find is closer to Earth size’s than that planet. (After a planet gets to be about 1.5 times the size of Earth is, its gravity attracts hydrogen and helium and makes it unlikely to have liquid water on its surface.) “I think it’s pretty pretty cool that they found this planet,” he says. “This shows that potential habitable planets are more common than our estimates.”

     
  7. 22:49

    Notes: 7708

    Reblogged from mucholderthen

    mucholderthen:

    Found! First Earth-Size Planet That Could Potentially Support Life
    Astronomers have discovered a planet about the size of Earth,
    orbiting its star in the zone where oceans of liquid water would be possible.

    From Space.com

    A study of the newly-found planet indicates it could have an Earth-like atmosphere and water at its surface. The planet Kepler-186f is the fifth planet of the star Kepler-186, 490 light-years away.

    The planet has 1.11 times the Earth’s mass. Its radius is 1.1 times that of Earth. Kepler-186f orbits at 32.5 million miles (52.4 million kilometers) from its parent star. Its year is 130 Earth days. 

    The planet orbits Kepler-186, an M-type dwarf star less than half as massive as the sun. Because the star is cooler than the sun, the planet receives solar energy less intense than that received by Mars in our solar system, despite the fact that Kepler-186f orbits much closer to its star.

     
  8. 22:45

    Notes: 317735

    Reblogged from sesametofu

    wwhatevver-ampora:

    moewave:

    ohh-tedbundy:

    A true warrior.

    I can’t believe he defeated Mr.Incredible

    I love how he fuckin fuckin STOMPS on Fred Flintstone

    (Source: notienedesperdicio)

     
  9. 18:01

    Notes: 14

    Reblogged from uchuubrodai

    bashiqu:

Jennifer from Space Brothers~! She is so cool <3[Space Brothers episode 29]

    bashiqu:

    Jennifer from Space Brothers~! She is so cool <3

    [Space Brothers episode 29]

     
  10. 16:36

    Notes: 2

    I think I’ll do a spontaneous two-day bicylcle trip this weekend to Strasbourg in France (Alsace) with my new bike, it’s only 85 kilometers from here and I just have to go along the Rhine river. I’ll try to find a place to sleep with couchsurfing. It will be cool.

     
  11. 00:20

    Notes: 124061

    Reblogged from yorkie2111

    Reblog if you wouldn’t mind some curious anons

    I wouldn’t mind though I doubt there are any, but I’ll see ^^

    (Source: daezilly)

     
  12. jtotheizzoe:

boop.
This man.

This experiment is very popular and was already performed in the same way by Richard Feynman and also quite well known by Walter Lewin. Still it&#8217;s awesome and better than any CGI. Science isn&#8217;t something that exists only in television or some crazy CGI, science applies to the real world and what&#8217;s best, it works. We can rely on it.

    jtotheizzoe:

    boop.

    This man.

    This experiment is very popular and was already performed in the same way by Richard Feynman and also quite well known by Walter Lewin. Still it’s awesome and better than any CGI. Science isn’t something that exists only in television or some crazy CGI, science applies to the real world and what’s best, it works. We can rely on it.

     
  13. 21:08

    Notes: 823

    Reblogged from christinetheastrophysicist

    ibmblr:

    The world’s largest telescope made with data
    Look up on a starry night and consider this: in our lifetime we just might find the answers to one of life’s biggest mysteries, and we mean BIG. Dutch research institute, Astron and its international partners are building the world’s largest radio telescope, aka The Square Kilometer Array, to get a glimpse of the origins of the universe. This big telescope is made up of thousands of interconnected smaller telescopes, carefully arranged in fractal patterns to let us look back in time more than 13 billion years—to mere seconds after the universe was created. How on Earth is this possible? By processing exabytes of Big Data (That’s a 1, plus 18 zeroes) in real time. Or roughly 3X the amount of data running through the Internet per day. Amazingly, this will let scientists map out how the universe came to be. Imagine the look on Galileo’s face if he were here to see it. Explore more stories →

     
  14. 02:27

    Notes: 5

    Reblogged from phoxbox

    On Monday, after seven months of discussion and planning, the first phase of a two-part audit of TrueCrypt was released.

    The results? iSEC, the company contracted to review the bootloader and Windows kernel driver for any backdoor or related security issue, concluded (PDF) that TrueCrypt has: “no evidence of backdoors or otherwise intentionally malicious code in the assessed areas.”

    While the team did find some minor vulnerabilities in the code itself, iSEC labeled them as appearing to be “unintentional, introduced as the result of bugs rather than malice.”

     
  15. 20:37 15th Apr 2014

    Notes: 285

    Reblogged from christinetheastrophysicist

    christinetheastrophysicist:

The Moon and Mars during the total lunar eclipse. The star Spica is faintly visible to the right of the Moon.

    christinetheastrophysicist:

    The Moon and Mars during the total lunar eclipse. The star Spica is faintly visible to the right of the Moon.